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Team Members

 Lab Director

Lyn

Lynnda Dahlquist earned a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Purdue University in 1981 and has been a faculty member at UMBC since 1996. Her research interests include the development of effective psychological treatments for the pain and fear children experience during medical treatment and child and family adjustment to chronic illnesses.

Graduate Students

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Caitlin Thompson is a sixth-year human services psychology graduate student at UMBC with a concentration in child clinical psychology. She received her B.A. from Wesleyan University in 2006 and her M.A. from UMBC in 2012. Prior to attending UMBC, Caitlin worked as a research assistant at the Center for the Advancement of Perioperative Health at Yale University where she was involved in several projects examining quality of life in children and their families before, during, and after surgery. Caitlin’s current research interests include the management of pain in children and the effects that childhood chronic illness have on child and family functioning. Her master’s thesis examined the relation between parent distraction behaviors and child distress during pediatric cancer procedures. Caitlin is currently working on her dissertation project examining the impact of executive functioning on children’s pain tolerance during cold water exposure.

 

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Jessica Hoehn is a fourth-year human services psychology graduate student at UMBC with a concentration in child clinical psychology. She received her B.A. from St. Mary’s College of Maryland in 2007 and will be receiving her M.A. from UMBC in Fall 2013. Prior to attending UMBC, she worked as a research assistant for the Center for Mind Body Research at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine.  Her work there focused on the relationship between chronic pain conditions and sleep. Jessica’s current research interests include the impact of child chronic illness on family functioning.  She recently completed her master’s thesis project examining the involvement and experiences of fathers of children with food allergy.

 

Emily FC

Emily Foxen-Craft is a third-year Human Services Psychology student with a concentration in child clinical psychology. She received her B.A. from McGill University in 2011 and her M.A. from UMBC in 2013. At McGill, Emily’s research focused on animal models of pain and young adults’ goal pursuit. Her master’s thesis examined behavioral task persistence in children with food allergy. Emily is currently working on her dissertation project examining exercise and pain tolerance in young adults and children.

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Emily Wald is a second year Human services psychology graduate student in the Pediatric Psychology Lab.  She obtained her bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida, and her master’s degree in Clinical psychology from Columbia University.  Her research interests include pediatric pain management and how family functioning affects the course of a chronic illness.

 

Julia pictureJulia Zeroth is a second-year human services psychology graduate student at UMBC with a concentration in child clinical psychology. After receiving her B.A. from UMBC in 2012 and working as an undergraduate research assistant in the Pediatric Psychology Lab, she just couldn’t leave! Julia’s research interests include acute pain management and family adjustment to childhood chronic illness. She is currently coordinating a study examining the effects of virtual reality distraction on pain tolerance in college students for her master’s thesis project.

 

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Wendy Pinder is a first-year graduate student in the Pediatric Psychology Lab. After graduating with her B.A from UMBC in 2011, Wendy worked as a research specialist in the Delaware Institute for Excellence in Early Childhood (DIEEC) at the University of Delaware. Wendy’s research interests include the impact of chronic illness on child and family well-being, parenting practices, and children’s social outcomes. She is currently working on her master’s thesis project looking at peer relations and social adjustment of young children with food allergy.